The Rugged Ruffed Grouse: Heartbeat of our Winter Forests

Photo credit: Corinne Lamontagne Wintry weather can take a toll on year-round wildlife residents of mid-Atlantic and northeastern forests. For roughly one third of the year, regional forests offer little protective broadleaf cover from predators and the elements, have limited food sources, and are frequently inundated with snow. In response to these lean

Resolve to do the best you can to advance clean water in 2018

Photo by Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program As we start to turn the page on 2017, I wanted to brainstorm some ideas for resolutions we can share as a community for 2018. The new year is a time to reflect on where we’ve been and what we’ve accomplished in the past year and to

New Year, New Chesapeake Forests Projects!

The start of a new year is perfect timing to highlight the new and exciting projects that the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay’s forest team will be rolling out in 2018. This work will serve landowners and local communities in their efforts to restore woodlands and manage for healthier forests and wildlife habitat throughout the

What happens when you put 80 sportsmen and conservation professionals in one room together? Partnership!

The barn at Millport Conservancy as the snow started to fall on December 15, 2017. Photo by Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay/Marissa Spratley On a cold and snowy day at the Millport Conservancy in Lititz, Pennsylvania over 80 sportsmen and conservation professionals alike gathered for a day of information sharing, networking, and brainstorming.

Mistletoe: A Merry Parasite

Despite occasionally being a bit of a Grinch, something I love about the holiday season is that we fill our houses with wild flora. Dozens of conifer species are displayed in homes as Christmas trees, wreaths of hemlock and fir hang from doors, and sprigs of American holly brighten up rooms with their glossy green

The Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay Recognizes 8 Lockheed Martin Facilities as Businesses For The Bay Members

The Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay is excited to recognize eight Lockheed Martin facilities throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed as Businesses for the Bay (B4B) Members! Lockheed Martin is the only company with multiple B4B Members. In addition, the Lockheed Martin – Owego, NY facility is the first B4B Member in New York! The Alliance recognizes the corporation

Citizen Stewardship Index Released

In November, the Chesapeake Bay Program released the results of the first ever Chesapeake Bay watershed Citizen Stewardship Index, in which the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay was an active participant in this project, along with the Chesapeake Bay Trust. Rooted in social science, the Index will directly inform the work of watershed organizations and

Celebrating A Dozen Chesapeake Watershed Forums

Attendees gather around a tree while Craig Highfield, ACB Director of Forestry Programs, teaches them about winter tree identification. By Kate Fritz, Executive Director It always feels like returning home when I drive through the gates at the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) in Shepherdstown, WV. And this year was no different.  

5 Reasons to Support the Alliance this Giving Tuesday

The Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay has been hard at work in 2017, putting more boots on the ground to clean up rivers and streams across the Chesapeake! Now more than ever before, our mission is so important. But, we need your help to keep our work going!  Here are 5 reasons why you should support the

Chesapeake Forest Champions Honored for Efforts to Conserve and Restore Forests

From left to right: Craig Highfield, Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay; Jenny McGarvey, Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay; Judy Okay; Kris West, Finger Lakes Land Trust; Jed Shilling; Sally Claggett, USDA Forest Service. Photo by Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program Trees are our greatest allies in reducing the amount of pollution that enters our

Species Spotlight: Wild Turkey

Cades Cove, Great Smoky Mountain National Park, Tennessee. Photo by Tim Lumley. In keeping with the holiday theme of our last newsletter articles, I quickly volunteered to write the article for this November. Maybe, subconsciously, my willingness to take on the task was out of sheer laziness, but of course this article is

Don’t Let Invasive Plants “Return From the Dead”!

Mile-a-minute (Persicaria perfoliata), oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), and Japanese stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum) swallowing up a pine in York County, PA. You could be next! Photo by Ryan Davis Invasive plants have a lot in common with zombies. They’re dangerous, hard to dispatch, and have a tendency to surround and overwhelm even the most