Gearing Up For Spring Tree Plantings!

Despite the unseasonably warm weather we’ve been facing lately, it’s technically not spring yet. In fact, our Chesapeake Forests Team is just beginning to prepare for the spring riparian buffer, or streamside tree, planting season in Pennsylvania. The two main ways we prepare for planting season are by live staking (propagation by cutting) and flagging

  • Close up of a single American woodcock.

Big Romantic Gestures from the Little American Woodcock

Romance is in the air. For the American woodcock (Scolopax minor), that’s a literal statement. The courtship ritual of the woodcock is the most elaborate that I’ve seen outside of Homo sapiens, and is a must-see for lovers of forests, birds, or flirtation. In the southerly parts of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, lucky residents

Attention Maryland landowners: Tree planting opportunity available

The trees on your land provide you a myriad of benefits. For the past few years the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay has teamed up with Maryland Forest Service and the Maryland Forestry Foundation to help landowners implement tree planting projects through our Healthy Forests Healthy Waters program. With funding secured from the

  • A close up of the flower, rudbeckia

Resolve to Lose a Little Lawn in 2020

There are many good reasons to have a lawn. A lawn can be used for overflow parking, a space for children and dogs to play, or as a stable surface for heavy foot traffic around buildings and houses. But about ten percent of the land in the Chesapeake Bay watershed is lawn cover. Do

  • Photograph of a monkey slug.

Otherworldly Creatures: you have to see it to believe it!

Folklore is a popular topic of conversation this time of year, and the Philippines, a country consisting of more than 7,600 islands in Southeast Asia in the Pacific Ocean, generates its fair share of ancient, creepy and mythical beasts. Consider the aswang (or evil shape shifter) known as Gumon. The Gumon literally has killer

  • Photo of Goblin's Gold (Schistostega pennata)

Goblin’s Gold

Are you afraid of the dark?  Walking through a forest in upstate New York, you come across a damp, dark cave. You are keen to move past it, fearful of what lies within. You hurry forwards when out of the corner of your eye an eerie greenish glow appears. Are you seeing things? What

Forests for the BATS Part IV: Riparian Forest Buffers for Bats

Our streams need trees. The very best thing we can do for water quality is to protect and increase the amount of streamside (or, if you’re inclined to speak Latin, riparian) forest cover. In the conservation world we call these strips of recently planted streamside trees riparian forest buffers; they are protecting our water

  • Photo of the fungus, Dead Man's Fingers (Xylaria polymorpha)

From the Grave: Dead Man’s Fingers

You’re walking through the woods on a crisp, late October afternoon, smelling the sharp scent of decaying leaves and listening to the dry rustle of beech leaves in the breeze. You decide to take a break, sit on an old stump, munch an apple and observe this amazing world…but, what is that reaching up

20 Acres of Trees Being Planted at Local School

PRESS RELEASE Contact: Marissa Spratley Email: mspratley@allianceforthebay.org Office: 443-949-0575 Cell: 410-718-2728 PRESS RELEASE: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 20 Acres of Trees Being Planted at Local School DCNR, Penn State, and the Alliance Partner to Help Improve Pennsylvania’s Water Quality Manchester, PA (October 24, 2019) Today, the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay (Alliance) joined Cindy Dunn, secretary

Correctional Conservation Collaborative Trains New Generation of Riparian Forest Buffer Professionals

Participants in the Riparian Forest Buffer Vocational Training hear about the finer points of buffer maintenance from Trevor Weaver (right), Watershed Specialist for the Mifflin County Conservation District and Ryan Davis (left), PA Forest Program Manager for the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay. Photo by Shea Zwerver On a sweltering July afternoon, a

Dangerous Plants of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

We highlighted two types of edible plants you can forage for in our July and August episodes of Tree Talks. On the other side of the spectrum are dangerous and toxic plants to avoid. Here is a list of some of the most poisonous plants in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.   Photo

Agroforestry and Native Understory Crops

Agroforestry is an exciting way to sustainably harvest food and herbs in your backyard without compromising your woodland. The concept of agroforestry has been around for decades, but is becoming increasingly popular due to its numerous environmental and economic benefits. Agroforestry is a science-based design framework of supplying food while integrating trees, shrubs, and ground